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How to Build Ford Restomod Street Macnines How to Build Ford Restomod Street Machines
by Tony E. Huntimer
This book Should be called
"How to Build High Performance Fords!"
This is one of the best books we've seen about building high
performance Fords. It contains sections on upgrading brakes
and suspension, improving chassis stiffness, engine choices
and engine swaps, drivetrain choices including
production and
after market transmissions, electrical
systems and even body
modifications. It even has sections
to help you find the right
project car for as little money as possible and where to find the
parts you need to complete your project. This is one of the
best, if not the best book out there about building and

modifying Fords for improved performance. Best of all, this
book is not just about the Ford Mustang as many other Ford
books are. Read the sample pages to learn more!
Click below to view samples
pages from each chapter
Chap. 1 - Shocks & Sway Bars
Chap. 2 - Front Suspension
Chap. 3 - Rear Suspension
Chap. 4 - Frames & Chassis
Chap. 5 - Engine Swaps
Chap. 6 - Transmissions
Chap. 7 - Body & Glass Mods.
Chap. 8 - Finding Parts
8-1/2 x 11"
Softbound.
144 pages
Approximately 300 b/w photos
Item: SA101P
Price: $23.95
Click here to buy now!


General Suspension, Brakes, Tires, and Wheels
The basic job of the shock absorber is to control or dampen the movement of the springs. A shock
absorber that is too soft will have a hard time controlling the suspension, causing the ride to be
bouncy and inefficient while cornering. If the shock is too stiff, the ride will be harsh and cause the
vehicle to slide too easily.
Tip of a mono tube shock absorber
Inside the body of
mono-tube shock there is
a piston with a valve on
the tip (shown here). This
valve controls the rate of
the shock. The small
stack of discs partially
blocking the flow
passages limits the speed
of the fluid flowing
through the valve. The
discs are swapped to
change bump and
rebound.
Shocks have two functions: compression and rebound. Compression is defined as the collapsing of
the shock absorber. This occurs when the car hits a bump and the suspension moves upward,
pushing the piston rod into the shock body. Rebound is when the shock extends. Most people
associate this with their car hitting a dip in the road, causing the suspension to drop and the shock
to extend, but rebound does much more than that. When you drive your car into a hard left turn,
the right front (outside) shock compresses, the left front (inside) shock extends. If you have the
right shock valving, the inside shock will resist extending (rebound) and the outside shock will resist
compression. In this way, the shocks assist the springs and sway bar to limit body roll and increase
cornering (lateral) traction.
Most factory replacement shocks do not have adjustable compression or rebound. Some
aftermarket performance shocks are available with internal valves that allow you to adjust them for
preferred compression and rebound. Those two settings are different for each application, due to
many factors, including vehicle weight, tires, and spring rates. In the past, drag car front shock
absorbers were marketed as 90/10 shocks. This generally meant that they were valved for 90
percent compression and 10 percent rebound. Shock experts say that 90/10 shocks are more of a
marketing term and a pair of actual 90/10 shocks would be very dangerous. Marketing shocks
based on percentages is an old trick that won’t seem to go away. They are better measured in
terms of how much force it takes to compress or extend the shock. Drag shocks are set up to allow
the front of the car to lift easily during the launch (the shock has very little resistance to extension),
but come down slow (more resistance on the compression), which transfers more weight to the rear
wheels for off-the-line traction. While this type of set-up is great for drag racing, it is not safe for the
street. A Restomod would be better with a shock valved with the compression and rebound
resistance much closer to equal.
Most conventional shocks are not rebuildable. The more expensive race shocks are rebuildable
and can also be revalved for fine-tuning your suspension. These shocks are usually adjustable in
some way. Some shocks have a knob at the bottom or top to adjust them from soft to firm. Other
shocks have to be compressed in order to adjust the firmness.
Adjusting the firmness on a Koni Classic shock absorber
To adjust the firmness of a
Koni Classic, you compress
to engage the valve inside.
Turn it clockwise to
increase firmness, and
counterclockwise for a
softer ride. You are never
stuck with a setting; if you
don’t like the ride – adjust it.
Mono-Tube Shocks
A mono-tube shock has a single chamber inside the shock body. A single valve at the end of the
piston modulates dampening. Mono-tube shocks are typically of high-pressure gas design, ranging
from 250 to 400 psi. The pressure inhibits cavitation caused by foaming or aeration if air gets
drawn through the valve. Since they only have a single chamber, mono-tube shocks dissipate heat
faster than twin-tube designs. They can be mounted upright or upside down.
Twin-Tube Shocks
A twin-tube shock has two chambers inside the shock body: an inner and outer chamber. The inner
chamber contains the piston and the oil. On the end of the piston is a valve. There is also a valve
at the bottom of the inner chamber, which modulates the amount of fluid forced into the outer
chamber.
There are two different ways to build twin-tube shocks. The more expensive way is to use a cellular
bag (also known as a “gas bag”). The bag is typically filled with Freon gas to 10 to 20 psi. Other
designs also include a foam material inside the gas bag. Some sources say non-gas bag designs
are more efficient. Unlike high-pressure twin-tube shocks, twin-tube gas-bag shocks don’t rely on
gravity. They can be mounted upright, upside down, or even sideways.
Coil-Over Shocks
Coil-over shocks are similar to conventional shocks, except for the threaded body or threaded
adapter collar. A coil-over shock replaces the factory shock and spring. The spring rate is
determined by the vehicle weight and intended ride quality. The coil is placed on the shock and
allows vehicle height adjustment. Both mono- and twin-tube shocks are available as coil-over
shocks.
Sway Bars
A sway bar or anti-roll bar is one of many parts that play a role in reducing body roll. The body-roll
elements are: spring rate, wheel center rate, tire rate, ride rate, and roll rate. The springs, shocks,
bushings, wheels, tires, chassis, and sway bars are all key parts in the car’s ability to corner well.
Obviously, a car would operate without a sway bar, but it would not be very safe or fun to drive.

The typical front sway bar ends attach to the left and right lower control arms. The main center
section of the bar is mounted to the frame rail on the left and right side of the front of the car. The
typical (non-IRS equipped car) rear sway bar ends mount to the left and right rear frame rails, and
the main center section of the sway bar mounts to the differential housing.

The main center section of the sway bar is horizontally attached to the right and left frame rail, and
it is able to pivot on a single axis. If the right end of the sway bar acts, the left end of the sway bar
reacts, and vice versa. This means if the right end of the bar moves upward, the left end of the
sway bar also wants to move upward. The same is true for downward motion.


In really basic terms, when a car is driven into a left-hand turn, the right (outside) control arm wants
to push the right end of the sway bar upward, which in turn makes the left end of the sway bar want
to lift the left (inside) control arm. At that same time, the left (inside) control arm is pulling the left
end of the sway bar downward, which in turn makes the right (outside) end of the sway bar force
the outside control arm downward. The action of the forces of both of the ends of the sway bar
counteract each other and are coupled to the frame, which causes the frame to attempt to stay
level to the ground, reducing body roll. A sway bar with a bigger diameter reduces more body roll.
Body roll affects lateral (cornering) traction of the tires by planting or forcing the tire down onto the
asphalt. Some body roll is necessary to increase the traction of the outside tire. If the suspension
does not have any body roll, the tires will tend to slide instead of biting for traction with the outside
tire.

The front and rear (if your car has one) sway bars can work together or against each other. A rule
of thumb: If your car has understeer, you can decrease the diameter of the front bar and increase
the diameter of the rear bar. If your car suffers from oversteer, you should increase the size of the
front bar and decrease or remove the rear bar.
Adjustable sway bar kit for a Ford Mustang Since 1975 Stam-Bar
Stabilizers has been
making sway bars for ’65
through ’73 Mustangs.
These sway bars
incorporate sliding end
links that allow the bars
to be fully adjustable for
the ultimate suspension
tuning. You can adjust
the bar when you get to
the track and move it
back before driving
home. (Photo courtesy
StamBar Stabilizers)
Aftermarket Sway Bars and Accessories
There are two types of aftermarket sway bars – conventional and racing. Conventional aftermarket
bars typically resemble the shape of a stock bar, with the exception of the increased diameter. They
even usually bolt into the stock bar locations. Conventional aftermarket sway bars were only offered
as solid units until 2000. In 2000, Hotchkis Performance started processing hollow bars. These
units are hollow, large-diameter bars that are as strong as their solid counterparts, but only a
fraction of the weight. As of the original release of this book, Hotchkis only offers hollow bars for the
late-1990 Ford models.

Quickor Suspensions and Addco offer a full line of solid sway bars for Ford and Mercury cars. Stam-
Bar Stabilizers offer adjustable front and rear sway bars strictly for the 1965 through 1973
Mustangs. The custom sliding adjustable end link system was derived from racing car technology
and it works great for tuning the suspension on your Mustang. Easy adjustments can be made at
the track or in your garage. If you are going to race on a track that has 85 percent right turns and
15 percent left turns, the Stam-Bar can be adjusted to increase bias and get more traction from the
outside tires.

Gun-drilled racing sway bars are completely different from conventional sway bars in appearance,
but they do the same job. Typically, this type of sway bar consists of a straight-splined solid or gun-
drilled (hollow) bar with adjustable aluminum or steel arms. They are mounted with solid bearings or
Delrin inserts. The aluminum or steel arms are available in many lengths, and they are usually
straight. The installer can then bend them to the desired shape, so that they clear the tires and
suspension pieces. These bars are used on circle- and dirt-track racing cars, but they also have
been showing up on full-tilt Restomods. At the time of this book’s publication, these types of bars
were only available from Griggs Racing for their 1965 through 1970 Mustang GR-350 custom front
suspension systems.

You can also engineer your own racing-style sway bars. You can pick up different width, diameter,
and wall thickness bars; different length and shaped arms; and the necessary hardware from
Speedway Engineering.
Sway bar bushings and end-links come in a few different types. The bushings are available in
rubber and polyurethane. The end-links are available in the standard rubber and polyurethane
through-bolt type, the solid rod-end type, or with stud-type rod ends.

The standard through-bolt end-links are the most common way to attach your sway bar to the
control arms. These end-links come in different lengths. To determine the length you will need for
your application, the car will need to be sitting at rest with the sway bar installed (with the exception
of the end links). If you pivot the sway bar so the ends are parallel to the ground, there should be a
gap between the end of your sway bar and the locating hole in the control arm. Measure that
distance; it will be the length of the end-link that you will need.

The solid rod-end style end-links work well on the track because they offer non-binding, fluid
motion. On the street, most car builders prefer the longer life of bolt-through types over the solid
rod-ends. Once the solid rod-ends wear, they will start making noise. As with any rod ends,
installing safety washers will ensure the rod ends will not totally separate if the ball wears out.
Automotive engineers are constantly coming up with new ways to mount the ends of the sway bars
to control arms. Keep your eyes out on the higher performance cars for new end links and other
hardware. Always keep your eyes and your mind open for new designs when you are around
racetracks and new car dealerships. You never know when you might see something that would
work great on your Restomod. This goes for every aspect of your car, not just the suspension.
Adjustable splined sway bar
Stock-car-style splined
sway bars typically
require a moderate level
of fabrication to mount
them. Since the arms on
these sway bars are
mounted at 90 degrees
to the shaft, tire
clearance is greatly
increased. Rod-end
end-links (not shown)
mount the bar to the
lower control arm.
Next


This has been a sample page from

How to Build Ford Restomod Street Macnines How to Build Ford Restomod Street Machines
by Tony E. Huntimer
This book Should be called
"How to Build High Performance Fords!"
This is one of the best books we've seen about building high
performance Fords. It contains sections on upgrading brakes
and suspension, improving chassis stiffness, engine choices
and engine swaps, drivetrain choices including
production and
after market transmissions, electrical
systems and even body
modifications. It even has sections
to help you find the right
project car for as little money as possible and where to find the
parts you need to complete your project. This is one of the
best, if not the best book out there about building and

modifying Fords for improved performance. Best of all, this
book is not just about the Ford Mustang as many other Ford
books are. Read the sample pages to learn more!
Click below to view samples
pages from each chapter
Chap. 1 - Shocks & Sway Bars
Chap. 2 - Front Suspension
Chap. 3 - Rear Suspension
Chap. 4 - Frames & Chassis
Chap. 5 - Engine Swaps
Chap. 6 - Transmissions
Chap. 7 - Body & Glass Mods.
Chap. 8 - Finding Parts
8-1/2 x 11"
Softbound.
144 pages
Approximately 300 b/w photos
Item: SA101P
Price: $23.95
Click here to buy now!


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